ml lang="en-US"> Comics | vermicious - Part 3

Category Archives: Comics

I Remember Beirut by Zeina Abirached

  There’s a reason that war memoirs from the point of view of children — or even fictional stories — continue to resonate and will probably never go away. As the scribble pads of our parents and the world they react to, children are the direct result of the personal damage done in war time. Grown-ups — for war is […]

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Small Press Trio

Frontier #6: Ann By The Bed by Emily Carroll Canadian cartoonist Emily Carroll excels in a form of horror that expresses its dread as much in the minds of the characters and the worlds they inhabit as with the particular terrors they face. With Ann By The Bed, she goes to lengths of perfection to craft the perfect fictional story […]

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Scaffold 1 by V.A. Graham and J.A. Eisenhower

The concept behind Scaffold is almost so big that it threatens to swallow the execution, but as the book unfolds, you realize that the concept and the execution are two sides of the same thing, working together to create a whole experience. Built around the idea of an advanced, mysterious prehistory, Scaffold takes place within a a society that uses their innovations to build […]

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She Wants To Tell Me by Laura Kenins

This tale of treading into unknown territory examines the more unexpected questions of doing so, ones of etiquette and meaning, ones that beg answers for what something means as part of the wider picture to which it belongs. In this context, it can be the moment one finds a discarded body part in a park and doesn’t know what to […]

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Doomboy by Tony Sandoval

This surprisingly sweet heavy metal-centered graphic novel follows a young guitarist named Id, whose rough edges cause conflict with the others around him, though his alienation ends up helping him create a legend of himself. At the root of Id’s battles is his cantankerous creative nature, but there’s something much more harsh going on — the death of Annie, his […]

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A Cat Named Tim by John Martz

If you were looking for a great way to add some visual sophistication to your kid’s picture book repertoire then A Cat Named Tim And Other Stories (Amazon, Powell’s) is a good choice, both for its simplicity and its demands. The narratives are basic, largely visual gags that Martz breaks up with a number of characters. Some of the best moments are […]

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The Hospital Suite by John Porcellino

This is not necessarily a fun book to read. I say that upfront because Porcellino’s art style, despite the image on the cover depicting himself in a hospital bed, is one of playful simplicity that, in a primal way, seems to promise something light-hearted. In fact, this medical-focused memoir is the chronicle of a breakdown, both physical and mental, and […]

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The Motherless Oven by Rob Davis

Taken at face value, it’s hard to know exactly what to make of The Motherless Oven (Amazon, Powell’s). Rob Davis has crafted a curious adventure that might be described as falling into the genre of dystopian fiction, but that does his story a bit of a disservice. At a time when dystopian fiction is pretty literally a dime a dozen, and infected […]

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Baby Bjornstrand by Renee French

Like the Monolith in 2001: A Space Odyssey, Baby Bjornstrand stands silent on the landscape, shaping events around it in mysterious ways. Unlike the Monolith, which was a cool, shiny, black slab, Baby Bjornstrand is a huge, cartoonish bird monster. Unlike 2001: A Space Odyssey, which depicted astronauts’ encounters with the cosmic unknown, Baby Bjornstrand (Amazon, Powell’s) depicts an unknown on the beach of a […]

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Jaybird by Jaakko and Lauri Ahonen

Grim in unexpected ways, Jaybird (Amazon, iBooks, Powell’s), a largely wordless graphic novel from Finland, seems like it’s going to be amusing story with gothic tones about a plump bird, but it becomes so much more. Our pathetic bird putters around a mansion that functions much like a sprawling jail, the definition of a gilded cage, really. It’s filled with remnants of another […]

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Fish by Bianca Bagnarelli

Fish (Amazon, Powell’s) is the first in a new imprint from Nobrow Press called 17×23, designed to highlight new graphic novelists in a short story format. Italian cartoonist Bagnarelli is the first up with an elegant package that presents a range of darkness in a bright format. Milo is being raised by his grandparents after the death of his parents after […]

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The Aeronaut by Alexis Frederick-Frost

  Alexis Frederick-Frost’s silent The Aeronaut is a brief delight, but one that has heart beyond its size. Inspired by Sir John Herschel’s clearly false account of the crazy visions of the moon that he spied through his huge telescope and Edgar Allen Poe’s equally disingenuous tales of his balloon crossing of the Atlantic, both for the New York Sun in the […]

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Debbie’s Inferno by Anne Emond

Periodically, someone will come along with a riff on Dante’s Inferno, but too often they focus on the  horrors rather than the clarity. That’s a mistake Anne Emond’s Debbie’s Inferno doesn’t make. Nor does it turn into a finger-wagging tour of other people’s distress, and that’s what truly makes it a great little comic. The set-up is simple enough. Debbie […]

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Distance Mover by Patrick Kyle

As something completely different from so much of the other genre fiction in the comics world, Patrick Kyle’s Distance Mover (Amazon, Powell’s) might best be described as surrealist science fiction echoing the sensibility of someone like Stanislaw Lem, mixed through old Doctor Who and cubist art. It follows Mr. Earth, one of the four Misters who oversee a huge planet of apparently […]

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Moonhead and the Music Machine by Andrew Rae

  Though told through a sheen of playful absurdist fantasy, Moonhead and the Music Machine (Amazon, iBooks, Powell’s) from Nobrow Press is your basic high school loser tale, and it’s one plenty of us can identify with. Ask anyone if they fit in very well in high school and they are apt to say they didn’t — it’s one thing that unites […]

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Jules Feiffer

It was a few years ago that I spoke with the  legendary Jules Feiffer in regard to the 50th anniversary of The Phantom Tollbooth, which he illustrated from Norton Juster’s story. His new book, Kill My Mother, has just been released. I’m sure I’ll review that, but I thought its release was a good opportunity for me to make available […]

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Sisters by Raina Telgemeier

In a world where graphic novels for younger readers can sometimes be gimmicky, over the top, cartoonish, Raina Telgemeier has focused on creating books with a singular quality that wraps itself around all aspects of her stories — sincerity. There are no bells and whistles in Telgemeier’s books, no flash, no high concept, just people, and the simplicity of her […]

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